In Russia they call it banya, in Mexico it’s a temazcal. In Japan one visits a sentō, in Finland a savusauna. Cultures around the world recognize the healthful benefits of heat and steam to the body. The Sweat Lodge (inipi wakan) is indigenous to the Americas and is one of the oldest native rituals in North America. Guests gather inside our stone walled sweat space.  As the temperatures rise, sweet herbs are burned to help focus and balance the senses. Used as a prayer circle, a Sweat Lodge offers purification, spiritual renewal, devotion of the heart and clarification of the mind. This is a special opportunity to align yourself with your highest path and deepest intentions. You are held safely, responsibly and with deep attention. Sunrise Springs is fortunate to host this sacred indigenous ritual that is led by a Native American ceremonialist.

What do I wear in the sweat lodge?
Modesty and comfort best describe the attire for the Sweat Lodge. It is respectful for men to wear loose, long bathing suits and t-shirts or light, loose-fitting clothing. Women wearing bathing suits should wrap a towel or sarong around the waist and wear a loose-fitting t-shirt.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING

  • If you have any chronic medical conditions, please consult with your medical provider before attending the Sweat Lodge ceremony.   
  • Be sure to drink plenty of water during the day of the ceremony. It is recommended to have had at least 6 glasses of water prior to the event. Lemon water infused with mineral salts are available at Guest Reception. 
  • The lodge is an enclosed circle space and the number of participants may vary. If you have a tendency to react in small, dark spaces, please talk to the facilitator and you can be seated near the door. 

Sign up is required and there is a $65 fee to participate.
This is a memorable experience that we hope you’ll enjoy!

  My favorite was the Spirit Lodge. Concha, a local traditional healer led the practice and provided a container for wholeness and healing–my highest recommendation and gratitude. –Vivian C.